Thank you Google.

Here is a review of my legal services. Enjoy my shame;


Paul Darnbough is one of the most incompetent solicitors you will ever meet, very volatile and aggressive with clients, several on going complaints with solicitors regulations authority, asks for large sums of money up front then ignores all correspondence, then threatens clients over the phone when asked for money back his reply is “sue me” stay clear I’ve had no option than to complain to sra and ombudsman along with issuing County court proceedings to recover my costs, looking into his back ground he has been sacked from numerous other solicitors in and around Manchester.


I did laugh out load. The review was posted by a very old and not so dear client whom I had represented, many years ago, in the Criminal Court. Having been instructed in the matter of his family proceedings was not a good idea.


I had explained that I would have to charge for my services, as detailed in my care and conduct terms and conditions letter. “It all boils down to money.” As my Dad said. But hey ho.

What the review of me and my practise reveals is the freedom and democracy of the internet. By that, I mean that if you put yourself in front of a keyboard and log onto the internet, there is no end to the damage you are able to inflict on the victim of your ‘trolling.’


What is trolling? I thank Wikipedia for this helpful analysis; In Internet slang, a troll  is a person who sows discord on the Internet by starting quarrels or upsetting people, by posting inflammatory,[extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community (such as a newsgroup, forum, chat room, or blog) with the intent of provoking readers into an emotional response or of otherwise disrupting normal, on-topic discussion, often for the troll’s amusement.

This sense of both the noun and the verb “troll” is associated with Internet discourse, but also has been used more widely. Media attention in recent years has equated trolling with online harassment. For example, the mass media have used “troll” to mean “a person who defaces Internet tribute sites with the aim of causing grief to families.”

So are the comments illegal? No you can say what you want. Are they libelous? Certainly. Meaning: making false or unfair statements that are likely to damage the reputation of a person or organization. So thanks for that mate.


I didn’t know that the negative comment had been put on my Google reviews page, until my colleague notified me. We then contacted Google to arrange or the comment to be removed. I was very upset by the review, until I saw who’ made it. But, would the comment damage my business and reputation, of course it would.


Should I seek financial redress? Even as a solicitor who specialises in managing on line disputes and reputation management issues. This was one fight I did not wish to get sucked into and be distracted by. There is no point suing a man of straw. When you can write to Google administrators to have the post removed.

I was tempted to leave the post. It’s so ridiculous and what all Troller’s fail to recognise; The comments made are always really about them. It’s at the top of the page if you want to revisit it.

So, even your personal legal service Paul Darnborough Solicitors. Who offer an online reputation management service can be victims of what they preach. I have drawn strength from this. So, dear reader, if you have been libeled, slandered, defamed, bullied or trolled on line. Why not give Paul Darnborough Solicitors a call. Via the website, direct email or directly on 0161 241 2734 we will look after you as we have to look after ourselves.